Benevolent Technologies for Health

(Winner – Daniel M. Lewin Grand Prize)

The Idea

Benevolent Technologies for Health develops low cost high impact healthcare solutions for underserved populations. Our initial product makes it possible for prosthetic care providers to create custom fit prosthetic sockets without the multi-day custom fabrication process. Our patent pending socket technology will be first in providing mass customization which will offer significant savings to prosthetic care providers while providing patients with superior comfort.

The Team

Ramin Abrishamian, Asa Hammond, Jason Hill and Elizabeth Tsai met at a H@cking Medicine Conference in 2012. Elizabeth is currently a MS student at the Media lab; Jason is an experienced human factors researcher and industrial designer; Asa is currently completing an undergraduate degree in Physiological Science at UCLA and has a background in visual effects and media design; and Ramin is an entrepreneur.

 

Bit Harmonics

(AARP Foundation Prize)

The Idea

Bit Harmonics is developing a software service to remotely monitor the energy efficiency of communities, homes, and individual appliances. While current household energy meters measure total energy use, machine learning techniques provide a detailed profile of how energy actively used in the home–down to the inefficient refrigerator or leaky A/C unit. With $170 billion spent on energy by U.S. households each year, “load disaggregation” can lead to more effective energy efficiency programs and lasting savings for homeowners.

The Team

Jake Whitcomb – MIT Systems Design and Management Fellow, Engineering System Division; MIT Electricity Student Research Group; former Co-Founder and Product Director, Brighter Planet.

Charles Baron – MBA student at Harvard; Co-President HBS Energy & Environment Club; former Program Lead, Energy Innovation and Geothermal at Google.org

 

glutenTech

(Audience Choice)

The Idea

glutenTech is developing a portable, point of use sensor for individuals who are gluten intolerant, meaning they cannot eat gluten containing foods such as wheat, barley and rye. Eating as little as 0.4 mg (1/200th a teaspoon) of gluten can incite symptoms ranging from breakdown of the small intestine and extreme gastric distress to the onset of full body rashes. The sensor being developed by glutenTech will allow the gluten free population to regain confidence in what they ingest and live healthier, more social active lives.

The Team

Our team currently covers both business and technology and holds a strong understanding of gluten-free consumer needs. Shireen Taleghani is an MBA candidate at MIT Sloan. Before Sloan, she spent five years doing sales and marketing strategy at YouTube and Google. She was diagnosed with a gluten allergy eight years ago and has been working on improving the lives of gluten-free consumers ever since. Jonathan Kiel holds a PhD in chemical engineering with 12+ years working in device based research, early stage start-ups and commercial scale manufacturing.